Saturday, June 20, 2015

Memoirs...

Started on my grandmother's memoirs for her today (finally). Here is the first excerpt:

When us children were small, we would visit our aunt Lottie Belle. Behind her home there at Copeland, Kentucky was a large water trestle where the water ran off the mountain side. On each side of the ditch were several grape vines. My cousins, brothers, and sisters would swing from one side of the hill to the other side on these vines. What fun we had! We didn’t have toys, but us children found other ways to amuse ourselves. Aunt Lottie Belle would call all of us children in for a snack. She had the coldest sweet milk and corn bread (or mush) for us to eat. She was a widowed woman at the time, as Uncle Monroe Brewer had died. He worked in the coal mines above my grandfather’s (Pap) house. We loved to visit in the country as there were open places for us to play. The river ran in front of Pap’s house, where we enjoyed swimming during the summer. Uncle Levi Strong would plow the fields for planting. The old horse (Mag) would be hitched up behind the plow. Then Uncle Levi would gather all of us at our cousin’s and put us on a wood platform for the horse to pull over the clots of dirt to break them out of the ground so he could plant crops. Oh, what fun! My sister Haney milked the cows as Big Lillie couldn’t get down on the stool they used for milking. There also was a big barn for us to play in, especially on rainy days. We would climb up into the loft of the barn overlooking the river and the hills across the way. At night the river would sound so peaceful, it would lull you to sleep. My brother Tom and I spent a big part of our lives at Pap’s. I am so thankful today that we were able to be with, and know our wonderful grandpa. Our Grandmother Strong died when I was five years old (1935). I’ve often wondered what she would’ve been like. I know she had to be a gentle and loving person, as my mother was so loving and caring. She loved everyone. My grandmother died of tisic (editor’s note: consumption). 

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